TRACEY SCOTT-TOWNSEND: What I did at 50

I’m delighted to welcome Myself onto my blog today, as part of my ‘What I did at 50’ series. This is the final post in the first blitz, but there are plenty more posts to come after the 24th of June, so stay tuned! 

birthday 54 Tracey

Tracey Scott-Townsend

I was a late-starter. From the age of ten I wanted to be a writer, but I think my ‘voice’ started to emerge in my late teens. I was drawn to otherness, and in retrospect I suspect my own, lifetime-experienced otherness has its roots in Autism. It’s probably too late (and too expensive) to have that confirmed now. Aged fifteen, I remember being asked by some school visitors (inspectors or governors, maybe) why it was that I sat on my own in my form room (facing a window, with my back to the rest of the class).
I wrote characters who didn’t fit in, who struggled out of oppression in some form. George Orwell’s Nineteen-Eighty-Four affected me deeply at O’ Level.

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Me at 16

I left home the summer before I was eighteen, lodging briefly on my older sister’s floor. We both worked in a nightclub, although I still had a further year of my A’ Levels. I stayed no more than a few months in any flat or bedsit, soon moving on to another. But I remember each location, and can picture myself in the different surroundings during the nights I sat up reading and writing: poems and attempted-novels. As in the way I never stayed in any accommodation long, I quickly moved on to the next novel that I wanted to write. However, there was one character I wrote who endured through my every attempt at a novel. She was anorexic Marianne Fairchild, who eventually took full form in my first published book. Her name was inspired by that of the character Marianne in Sense and Sensibility, which I remember sitting reading in my wooden armchair throughout one night at a flat I lived in when I was eighteen.

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Aged twenty, I dropped out of my Sociology and Social Anthropology degree at Hull University. I told my personal tutor it was because I wanted to write a book. But that book never progressed any further than the ones before it. My boyfriend dropped out of university too, to try and pursue his music career. But we were both lethargic. Before long, and in a doomed relationship, I had become pregnant. I knew she would be a girl.

By the summer of 1984 we had moved into a communal house in Kilnsea, on the banks of the Humber Estuary. The location of mudflats and seascape imprinted itself in me deeply, and it’s the setting for three of my novels: The Last Time We Saw Marion, Of His Bones and The Eliza Doll.

My three novels set in Kilnsea, East Yorkshire

 

I lost my baby at six months, another experience that has permeated my writing. During the time I lived at Kilnsea, I completed my first novel, handwritten over two thick notebooks. I think it was something that just needed to be written and I never took it any further. After we moved back into Hull, I began studying for a degree in Visual studies. My relationship broke down and, living alone again, I stayed up late into the nights writing, after I had finished my artwork for the day. Aged twenty-six, I completed the first draft of what eventually became my first novel, The Last Time We Saw Marion, as well as a short story that eventually became my second published novel, Another Rebecca. But the two stories were to lay dormant for more than twenty years.

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I graduated from my art degree while pregnant with my first son. I got married the same summer, and went on to have two more sons and a daughter. I worked as an artist, exhibiting and teaching workshops, but I continued to think of myself as a writer. When my daughter was one and I was thirty-seven, my marriage broke down. I moved back to Lincolnshire with my children.

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My Children

 

I continued teaching art workshops, and went on to do a fine art MA. But I still thought of myself as a writer. Every now and then, over the years, I brought out the draft of the full-length novel I had written, and did some re-writing. But my time was filled with single-parenthood, making art for exhibitions, and the temporary teaching job I was offered at a secondary school in the wake of my MA, (initially supposed to be six weeks!) The job lasted two and a half years, by which time I had met up with a former school-friend who had also become a single parent. Phil and I married when we were both almost forty-seven and we lived in a tall house overlooking the South Common in Lincoln, where we tackled becoming a step-family.

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When my school teaching job finally came to an end, I was able to write full-time. I used the lesson-planning discipline I had learned as a teacher to fully apply myself to writing this time around.

I was offered a publishing contract for The Last Time We Saw Marion when I was fifty years old. The book was published by Inspired Quill the following year, when I was fifty-one.

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In the almost-decade since I married Phil, I’ve developed a close relationship with mortality. I’ve lost two sisters, my father, and several friends. It makes me achingly aware of how brief a touchdown we have on this earth. Phil and I are making the most of our life together. He took early retirement from his long-term job when we were fifty-five, and we started our own publishing company, Wild Pressed Books. We regained the rights to my second novel Another Rebecca.

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Another Rebecca (second edition)

 

We have also published my books The Eliza Doll and Sea Babies, as well as several novels and poetry collections by other writers. We’ve just signed up our ninth author!

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Wild Pressed Books at the Northern Publishers’ Fair

 

The other massive lifestyle change we’ve undertaken is to do as much travelling as we can in our camper van. It started when we were a family of eight. We decided to buy a second-hand minibus – a huge, old LDV Pageant — and it immediately suggested itself to me as a home on wheels! It was at the age of fifty that Phil and I began venturing further afield than the outreaches of Yorkshire. We’ve explored most of Scotland, returning to the Outer Hebrides several times, and it’s where my fifth novel, Sea Babies is set.

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Ardroil, Uig, Isle of Lewis – setting for Sea Babies

 

We’ve also been to Ireland and to Germany, via Holland and Belgium (for my son’s wedding). Later this year we’ll be driving to Portugal.

Driving in Germany

 

At the age of fifty-six, Phil and I, together with my son and daughter-in-law, have bought our very own property in Portugal – a rustic two-roomed house with two-and-a-half acres of land on which grow olive trees, sweet chestnut trees and cork-oak. We’re currently in the process of buying a second building and extra land to accommodate the four of us.

our house in Portugal

Our future home in Portugal

 

The future feels vivid, and you can expect novels set in Portugal from me from now on!

My latest novel is Sea Babies…

SEA BABIES buy link

Sea Babies front Cover with quotes

Blurb:

Lauren Wilson is travelling by ferry to the Outer Hebrides, about to begin a new job as a social worker with the Islands’ youth. She’s also struggling to come to terms with a catastrophic event. When somebody sits opposite her at the cafeteria table, she refuses to look up, annoyed at having her privacy disturbed. But a hand is pushing a mug of tea towards her, and a livid scar on the back of the hand releases a flood of memories…                     

Some people believe in the existence of a parallel universe. Does Lauren have a retrospective choice about the outcome of her terrible recent accident, or is it the bearer of that much older scar who has the power to decide what happens to her life now? 

Set mainly in the Outer Hebrides and Edinburgh from the 1980s to the present, Sea Babies is a potent, emotional psychological drama that explores the harder aspects of relationships, as well as the idea of choice, responsibility and the refugee in all of us.

Sea Babies: BUY HERE

My Author page on Facebook

Connect with me on Twitter

This is the end of the first blitz of ‘What I Did at 50’ posts. Service will resume in late June, with a new series from writers, bloggers and others.

CHRISTINE WEBBER: What I did at 50

I’m incredibly excited to feature an interview with Christine Webber, former Anglia TV news presenter, agony aunt, psychotherapist and author, as part of my ‘What I did at 50’ series today. Read on and enjoy!

Christine headshot

Christine Webber

Hi, Christine. Thank you so much for ‘appearing’ on my blog. I’m excited to say that we’re going to be discussing your wonderfully interesting life, in line with my series of features entitled What I did at 50.

As someone who’s now approaching my late fifties, I’m constantly seeking out new challenges and adventures. What has been your attitude to each transition from decade to decade?

Hi, Tracey. I am a great believer in landmark birthdays spurring you onto greater things.

I share your sentiment. First of all, what were you like as a child and what did you imagine you might one day become?

From a very early age, I just knew I wanted to do something different. I know this doesn’t sound very nice but I wanted a life full of incident and for it to be very different from that of my parents. 

Did you have any further goals as you moved into your 20s and beyond?

I was quite musical and I played the piano reasonably well as a child. (I still play!) But my main goal as I grew into my late teens was to be a professional singer. I trained at the Guildhall School of Music. I did have a career of sorts, but I was just not good enough to make a good living at it. I did some acting. Again, I was nothing special. And then I turned my attention to television. I had a feeling I might be better at that. So, I gave myself until 30 to get into the business and managed to land a continuity announcer job for British Forces Broadcasting just before that deadline. This led, two years later to my dream job as a TV news presenter for Anglia TV.

Wow, getting your dream job must have felt amazing. I remember that my sister wanted to be a news presenter as a child, and used to practice announcing to the rest of us. Tell us something about the job. Was work fulfilling enough to meet all of your needs? Tell us more…

It was absolutely wonderful. And all my greatest friends stem from that time. I presented the news and also produced and presented features within the programme. This was when there were only four channels and the media world was very different from how it is now. I interviewed so many interesting people. I think Prince Philip was the most prestigious but actually when you interview a member of the Royal family, all the questions are decided ahead of time – by a committee really – so it wasn’t particularly satisfying. But I did enjoy chatting to actors, writers, artists, politicians and lots of so-called ‘ordinary people’ who were doing extraordinary things.

Then I decided as I approached 40 that I would write a novel, and that I would make a career-change from television into writing. It wasn’t quite as simple as that!  But I entered the novel into a competition for first-time writers. I didn’t win, but somehow, luckily for me, the publishers on the judging panel felt I had something to offer and In Honour Bound was published by Century shortly after my 40th birthday. The other thing about being 40 was that I realised I had found the love of my life and I married him a year later. He was a doctor, called David Delvin, who I had booked to do a medical slot with me in 1983. We worked together very happily, fell in love in 1987 around my 40th birthday and married a year later.

Christine wedding

I love the photo.  Let’s move on to the decade in question. What happened at the age of 50?

Aged 50, having left television and moved into the world of being an agony aunt, I nailed what I thought was going to be a job for life with TV Times. The two previous incumbents had been Katie Boyle and then Miriam Stoppard. Both held the position for years and years. Imagine my disappointment only a few months later, when the editor decided to get rid of all features in the magazine that were anything to do with health – and the agony aunt column was one of the casualties.

I’m sorry to hear that. It must have felt devastating. (On a side-note, Miriam Stoppard’s Pregnancy and Childbirth book was one of my bibles when I was expecting my first son!) But anyway, being an agony aunt must have been fascinating, for the duration it lasted.

Having accepted the loss of that job, what did you decide to do after that?

There was quite a lean period, as I recall, but eventually I got other agony aunt jobs both in print and on TV. But being 50 made me look more carefully at my future career and I made the very significant decision to train as a psychotherapist. This gave me credibility as an agony aunt and also generated more TV work as an ‘expert’ rather than as a presenter. It also led to the commission of three self-help books – Get the Happiness Habit, Get the Self-Esteem Habit and How To Mend a Broken Heart. Additionally, together with my husband, I wrote all the sex and relationship content of the Netdoctor website. And I started a practice in Harley Street.

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How to Mend a Broken Heart

Training as a psychotherapist was a good move, then. It sounds as though you became incredibly busy, and I imagine it was satisfying to work alongside your husband on the Netdoctor website. What led on from that?

At 60 I chose to stop writing the kind of self-help books I’d been penning and set about trying to write a comprehensive book about ageing; ageing in a way that was very different from that of our parents. It took a while, a change of publisher and agent to achieve that ambition but when I was 63, finally, Too Young to Get Old hit the bookshelves.

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Too Young to Get Old

I must look that book up. I’m definitely too young to get old! Did you make any more life-changing decisions?

I carried on with writing columns for magazines like BBC Parenting and for websites, and David and I landed a joint column in the health section of The Spectator. But as I was approaching 70, I realised that if I was going to return to writing fiction, I’d better get on with it before I got too old. For a variety of reasons, I decided to indie publish. And Who’d Have Thought It? – a romantic comedy for mid-life readers – came out eight months before the big birthday.  This has been followed by It’s Who We Are and a re-write of my first novel In Honour Bound.

Who’d Have Thought It? and It’s Who We Are

So what’s next for you, Christine?

My landmark 70th year was very happy in some ways because of my fiction writing. But very sad because my lovely husband died before I was 71. We knew he was ill. It wasn’t sudden. And we absolutely made the best of those last months, but to say there is a gap in my life now would be a massive understatement. I do however remain very grateful for the 30 years we had together which were absolutely marvellous.

I’m so glad the two of you made the most of your last months together, and I’m happy you have such wonderful memories…

What are your plans now?

I have more time on my hands now to write and do various other things, so I keep very busy. Quite apart from anything else, feeling useful and occupied helps me to deal with the loss of David. I am about 30,000 words into my next book which is all about three women in their late 50s and early 60s at major crossroads in their lives.

Also, I am taking up opportunities that present themselves that I certainly could not have tackled when David was ill. One lovely thing is that I have become an interviewer/presenter for the Royal Opera House for their Insights Programmes. These are tributes to great artists who work at Covent Garden and in them we explore that person’s career and talk about their life, and play clips of their triumphs, for an hour and a half in front of an audience.

I was very fortunate to be approached by Gary Avis, a marvellous dancer – the Principal Character Artist of the Royal Ballet – to host his evening. That was a real thrill. Over the years Gary has become a great friend so to have been given the honour of guiding him through his big night was just fantastic. And a couple of weeks ago, I also had the privilege of interviewing the world-famous bass baritone, Sir Bryn Terfel.

Interviewing Sir Bryn Terfel

Interviewing Sir Bryn Terfel

It’s great to have a new adjunct to my career at 72!

Also, I have been asked to be in a pantomime this Christmas. (The last time that happened was in 1976!) I am going to job-share the role of Fairy Beanstalk with my great friend Helen McDermott. Needless to say, the fairy will be a pretty old and daffy one. 

The next thing to decide I suppose is what on earth I can do that’s new when I’m 80!

I’ve enjoyed this interview with you so much, Christine. Many thanks for taking part and I wish you all the very best with your future endeavours, whatever they may be!

Here are a few details about Christine’s novel, In Honour Bound.

In Honour Bound by [Webber, Christine]

In Honour Bound BUY HERE

Blurb: Set in 1980’s London, Helen Bartlett, a popular TV news presenter and Sam Aziz, a glamorous middle-eastern cardiac surgeon, meet on a live programme. They dislike each other on sight, and the interview is a disaster. But that is not the end of their story because later that evening, they find themselves at the same dinner party.
Over the weeks, hostility morphs into passion, and soon they fall desperately in love.
Both are looking for the right partner with whom to settle down and produce a family. They seem made for each other; they delight in the joy that they have found, and plan to marry. But then, the differences in their cultural backgrounds start to manifest themselves. And a debt of honour that Sam cannot ignore returns to haunt him.
Struggling with their torment, while she is so much in the public eye and he is performing life-saving surgery on a daily basis, places them under intolerable strain.
Must they relinquish the most magical relationship either of them has ever known? Can they find a way out of their dilemmas? Or do they have to accept that no matter how modern we are, we cannot fly in the face of the traditions that served, and shaped us, for centuries?

In Honour Bound BUY HERE

Connect with Christine:

Web Christine Webber

Twitter @1chriswebber

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Christine Webber

Paul Marriner: Guest post on Why He Writes

Today I’m welcoming Paul Marriner to my website, talking about WHY he writes (as opposed to how, where or what genre he writes in… Thanks for joining us, Paul.

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When I tell people I write the most common question is, ‘Where do you get your ideas?’ not, ‘Why?’ Perhaps they assume it’s for the glory and the money – ha ha. So when I asked myself the question I went back to the beginning.

From an early age I read avidly. Our local library was stuffed with books where I found adventure, excitement, characters I could relate to and wanted to meet, trivia and facts (perhaps a boy thing?) and a place where my imagination could be in jeopardy while I was still in my bedroom. In short, entertainment and education – though many might say much of what I learned has been most useful in pub quizzes and crosswords. And the great news was that as I grew, I found books for each age, including, let’s be honest, a few ‘unsavoury’ tales that were best hidden from my parents (The Mack Bolan Mafia revenge series? Yes, really). Interestingly, I never thought of reading as a form of escapism. I had a busy, active childhood and teenage years and books were not a refuge in any sense, but great entertainment in a world with few tv channels and no internet.

The Godfather jpgCatch 22 jpg

By the middle of my teenage years I had perfected the art of immersing myself in books like ‘The Godfather’, ‘Catch22’, anything by Alastair Maclean or Arthur Hailey, and, dare I say it, ‘Chopper’ and ‘The Run’ (you may need to look up those last two). And I couldn’t understand how not everyone found it so easy to ‘jump’ into a book. I should say that at this stage, though I enjoyed writing stories for my English classes, I had little interest in the academic side of learning why the traditional greats of fiction (eg. Dickens, Austen, Hardy) were so lauded. In my later teenage years I began to think about how wonderful it must be to be able to write stories that pulled the reader in, engaged them and, in some way, educated – even if still in terms of ‘boyish’ facts, like where to get a sniper’s rifle made (‘Day Of The Jackal’). Then my grandmother gave me a copy of ‘Boys And Girls Together’ by William Goldman (I remember to this day her telling me it was a little ‘racy’ for her) and I began to think a little about how stories are structured and characters developed.

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I read more of Joseph Heller and William Goldman’s work and started on John Irving. And not only was I being entertained and reading ingenious ways of using the English (American?) language, I was introduced to different-thinking characters that I’d never meet in real life. I was also being subtly asked to think about new ideas (at least, new to me) regarding politics, gender, race, love, hate, life and death. And more and more I was asking myself, ‘What would I have done?’ in response to the conflicts (be they moral or physical) being fought by my favourite protagonists – not all of which were heroes. It was probably about this time I read ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ for the first, but not the last, time. I also read some Sci-fi (‘Dune’ etc.), fantasy (‘Lord Of The Rings’, the Thomas Covenant series), thrillers and crime novels and enjoyed them immensely for the interesting ideas and imagination they brought. They, too, raised important questions but I often struggled to place myself into the story. In case it’s of interest, I also read books by the likes of Tom Sharpe and George MacDonald Fraser both of whom were hugely talented story tellers with a skill for pacey narratives and humour.

I had become a big fan of William Goldman and his ability to write great stories in any genre, not to mention screen plays, and I started to wonder about what it took to be not just a story teller but a writer. In particular a quote from Goldman struck a chord with me (though I don’t think his was the original quote). It went something like, ‘Believe you have secrets to tell.’ From this I inferred that it was ok to have some confidence that you ‘knew’ or ‘saw’ something many others didn’t and finding a way to tell them, in a story, was a worthwhile pursuit.

So I tried to write some stories and it was very, very difficult. By now life, family, work, sport and music was keeping me busy, though I kept reading. All the time I harboured an aspiration to write something that would entertain (that word yet again), might hold up a mirror to the reader, reveal (perceived) secrets and nudge them to ask questions of themselves and others. That was what I’d found in my favourite books and to do all that within a story of my own creation would be an achievement.

Whether I failed or succeeded it would have to be writing the stories I wanted to, in my own style, whatever that might turn out to be… Which is what I’m doing, though it’s not always easy to type with fingers crossed that there’s an audience out there somewhere that will enjoy the engagement, look into the mirror I’m trying to hold up and think about some questions perhaps they hadn’t considered before. Sometimes I write a piece which edges close to achieving those aims (in my view) and occasionally the prose is interesting, perhaps even ‘alive’, in some sense. And on those rare occasions the satisfaction makes the hard work, knock-backs and self-doubt worthwhile – and, boiling it right down, that’s really why I write, for those rare moments.

I should add I also had some small hope that I could write stories which encouraged me to explore and understand some of my own history, background and motivations. To an extent this has been the case but I feel I’m still not clear in my own mind about the success, or otherwise, of that, so perhaps it’s a topic for another time. It may turn out this is the best reason of all for me to write, but it’s early days yet…

I’d like to finish with a big thank you to Tracey for giving me a reason to take a step back and think through some stuff I hadn’t properly considered before.

Paul

Paul on drums

Check out Paul’s novel The Blue Bench here

My Dogs in my Books

Our beautiful, black Labrador, Riley, travelled all over the UK with Phil and I in our former van, the bus-with-a-woodstove. Similarly to ‘Jack’ in my novel The Eliza Doll. Jack lives in a van with his companion, Ellie, who travels the country selling her handmade dolls at craft fairs. Jack is modelled entirely on Riley.

blue streaked sky at Arran

riley me van

It nearly broke our hearts when Riley had to be put down in 2016. He had poisoned himself by eating what we think may have been a death cap mushroom.

Beloved boy

We now have two rescued dogs who were both found on the streets of Romania. Luna, my birthday present two years ago, came to live with us when Riley was still alive. They were a perfect visual contrast and shared a brief love. Luna had been found in a cardboard box…

dogs in box

…on the street in Budapest with her two sisters at the age of about five months. Riley helped her acclimatise to family

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(and beach) life.

Luna Riley beach

In my sixth novel, Luna ‘plays’ Alicia, a white stray dog that adopts my character Maya, while she’s living in a Catalonian mountain community. The Vagabond Mother, as yet unpublished, is the story of a middle-aged woman who takes off with a backpack, in search of her missing son. In the book, Alicia follows Maya as she leaves the community she’s been staying at to hitch hike to Barcelona, and Maya ends up taking her back to the UK with her. Alicia is as loyal, nervous and loving as my own lovely Luna.

Luna

Pixie is the second dog we adopted from Seven Strays Dog Rescue. It was too sad that Riley had to be put down and that Luna was left alone, so we chose a smaller dog to keep her company. Allow me to present introduce Miss Pixie:

Pixie

Pixie was also abandoned in Romania. She had a puppy, who has now also been rehomed in the UK.

pix n pup

Pixie ‘stars’ in my fifth novel (currently out on submission) Sea Babies. Pixie plays a similarly-small, brown dog call Titania (Tatty) who’s dumped on my main character, Lauren. Lauren quickly grows to love Tatty and they explore the wild countryside of Uig on the Isle of Lewis together (see second-to-top picture in this post) and Tatty comforts Lauren while she comes to terms with a recent, drastic change in circumstances

Luna and Pixie love each other, and they love me and Phil and our cat, Pheoby. The Girls (including the cat) are happy whether we’re off on one adventure or another in our van, but also when we cuddle up on the sofa at home.

P and LL and P

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Oh, and here’s a picture of Pheoby, the camping cat. I really must add a strong, female cat character in my next book…

pheobs

Another Rebecca News!

AR eBookPaper

I’m excited to announce that Another Rebecca (originally published by @InspiredQuill in 2015, will be re-released with a brand-new cover by @wildpressed in September this year.

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Here’s the blurb:

Rebecca Grey can’t shake off the hallucination she had while in hospital, but her alcoholic mother Bex is too wrapped up in the ‘Great Grief’ of her youth to notice her daughter’s struggle to define dream from reality.
The two of them lurch from one poverty-stricken situation to another. But why does an old woman she has never met believe she is Rebecca’s grandmother, and why did Bex swear to stop living when she was only nineteen?
Another Rebecca is a family story of secrets, interdependency and obsessive love.
Another Rebecca was inspired by the painting ‘There is no Night’ by Jack B. Yeats.

INTERVIEW WITH THE AUTHOR
Tracey Scott-Townsend on ANOTHER REBECCA

 

1) Comparing the writing of my second novel, Another Rebecca with my first, The Last Time We Saw Marion?

The seeds of both novels were sewn in 1989 when I lived alone in a flat in Hull. I was between two long-term relationships and in the third year of my art degree. I did a lot of writing as well as painting. The Last Time We Saw Marion was a novel from its inception, but Another Rebecca began as a short story, inspired by the painting There is No Night by Jack B. Yeats.
I began my full-time writing career in 2010 when my job as a teacher ended. By this time I had married for a second time, after being a single parent to my four children for ten years. I resurrected the 1989 draft of The Last Time We Saw Marion and completely re-wrote it. While the completed book was doing the rounds of agents and small presses, I started to develop my short story There is No Night into a second novel which became Another Rebecca.
Writing, rewriting and several rounds of edits of my first book had taught me that for me the production of a novel to the standard that I want it to be is a long process

I learned along the way by experimentation and whatever feedback I could glean from multiple rejections of The Last Time We Saw Marion. In writing Another Rebecca I had more experience and also some highly professional input, such as a workshop with one of my most-admired writers, Audrey Niffenegger.

2) Family is an important theme in my writing.

I am a product of the things that have happened to me, the decisions I’ve made and the actions I’ve taken. Childhood is a deeply buried influence in anyone.
I believe I’m susceptible to some degree of synaesthesia: a name would always conjure a colour in my mind’s eye and a picture, a snippet of music, a smell or a touch evokes memories in the same way that a film is brought on screen at the touch of a button.
I resurrect memories from my childhood onwards and dissipate them into plot lines. New characters are born from the cells of the disappeared versions of me and my past.
I am a daughter, a sister and a mother. I’ve experienced losses and gains in all of these roles. Because my novels are essentially about the human condition; family, in whatever form it occurs, cannot help but be an important theme to me.

3) Narrative voices.

I tend to use more than one narrative voice in my novels. Initially Another Rebecca was told exclusively from the close first-person perspectives of Rebecca and Bex. But the reader could only see and know what these two claustrophobically intertwined characters were telling us and there was too much story to be told effectively in this way. So I brought in Jack, Rebecca’s father, as the third first-person narrator. He also steps back and gives us a wider view of the character of Bex in the past which helps to give us the full story.

4) The settings in Another Rebecca.

The book is set in England and Ireland. Skegness, where Rebecca lives at the beginning of the story, was my local seaside town when I lived in Lincoln. Rebecca then moves to a caravan in a Lincolnshire village which is based on the real village of North Scarle where I lived in a caravan when I was Rebecca’s age. My father built a house on the site.
Rebecca visits her aunt in County Leitrim, Ireland, where my sister lived for a long time. Then Rebecca goes to live in a fictional house in the village of Newtown Linford in Leicestershire. I have been camping with my children in this district for more than 20 years, so I know the area well. It’s on the edge of Bradgate Park. This is the home of Lady Jane Grey, the nine-day queen of England, who appears to Rebecca in the park and gives her some salient advice. I’m familiar with the location because I go to a camp in some adjacent woodland every year, and we always take a walk through the village to the park.

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Guest post from Lana Christon: My week as a PA

F13F53BE-41EE-466C-8264-DB9108D6DF75My Week as Author PA
Throughout my first year at Sixth Form, teachers have drilled into us that as Year 12 students, we should know what we want to do in the future; and most of my peers know somewhat exactly what they want to do. I, however, was not so fortunate. Only in January did I decide what I wanted to do at university (American Studies if you were curious) I began to research any work experience I could within my local area. I had always enjoyed reading, however my interest was pushed aside when school got in the way, and it was actually when talking to my English teacher that she asked ‘Have you considered publishing?’ – The thought had never before crossed my mind.

Following this I simply googled ‘Publishers in Lincoln’ and Wild Pressed Books was the first option that appeared. Their books were interesting, it wasn’t too far from home, and the mention of their two lovely dogs instantly appealed to me. Several emails back and forth between Tracey and I explained what I would be doing, and there wasn’t an option that I didn’t want to explore further.image2

As I finished school I was quickly back to waking up at 7am to catch the train, and I was beyond nervous. I had been somewhat scarred by work placements in the past, and I had no idea what – or who – to expect. However as I knocked on the door, greeted by Pixie and Luna’s barks, and Tracey herself, my worries were soon diminished.
I was quick to begin researching various publishers, literary agents, and how other authors promote and market their books, the last task that I found the most motivating. The rest of my week in fact, revolved around this. I discovered that my interests lay around marketing and publicity. image1

On my third day I even wrote a blog post about ways authors can market their books, both existing and upcoming. Being an English Language and Literature student, writing non-fiction came as second nature to me, and the fact that I wrote a blog post that has been published on a website will definitely prove beneficial. In addition to this, I wrote a post about Holly Bidgood, one of Tracey’s published authors. By the end of the week I will have written three blog posts (something that will hopefully appeal to any future employer).

The week also consisted of social media upkeep, tweeting and retweeting after I’d introduced myself as PA, as well as reading original and edited manuscripts Tracey had worked on. I didn’t realise how much a book can change from its first draft, to the final product, yet still have so much of the original voice and content from the author.

publishing perks

My week as PA has been thoroughly informative. I surprised myself when I enjoyed the logistical side of the publishing business far more interesting than the reading and editing side, but I am relieved that I now have a clue on what I want to do in the future. Whether it be within the publishing business, or elsewhere, my interests definitely lie within marketing and research (and maybe even a bit more blog writing too!).

I can only say thank you to Tracey for allowing me to work with her for the week, giving me the opportunity to experience every aspect of a publishing company, and giving me some assurance about a world of work I would be more than happy to work in.IMG_2993