RICHARD SAVIN: What I did at 50…

Tracey: It’s my pleasure to introduce Richard Savin today, with his take on how to surf the decades with panache — post two in my series about making life-changes at the age of 50 (as well as before and after!) Read all about Richard’s adventurous and ever-fluctuating lifestyle and enjoy. Welcome, Richard.

The author - Book launch party

Richard: Thank you. I know a lot of people see 50 as some kind of watershed and make a change in their lives.

Mine has been a little different because I have changed direction and pursuits about once every decade; which I strongly recommend as a life style. I started out working in the City of London, training to be an actuary – and I hated it. I decided then to give myself 10 years out, just doing what took my attention. In that time I travelled a lot, doing all sorts of things: window cleaning, gardening, hearse driver (in Australia) freelance journalist, , motorcycle courier, tyre fitter working on earth movers in a quarry just outside of Perth in West Australia; then there was my passion for motor sport. I had been driving in club competition with a little formula junior I owned and occasionally an outing with a friend’s 1936 Ulster TT Aston Martin – my home circuit was Brands Hatch in Kent. Then in 1963 I had the chance to drive for Ford on a record run publicity stunt for the launch of their new Cortina model. London to Istanbul, non-stop with two co-drivers. We made it in 52 hours 23 minutes and a few odd seconds. The record still stands unbroken to this day.

Cortina 1200 - on loan from Ford

Cortina 1200 – on loan from Ford

 

Formula junior - Brands HatchFormula Junior – Brands Hatch

My second ten years was in journalism. I started out writing for motoring magazines then joined a press agency, operating in Asia: Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. Most of my ten years was spent between Islamabad and Calcutta. At the end of my time I wrote my first book (non-fiction) about my experiences in Iran during the run up to the revolution. This was commissioned and published by Canongate in 1980. I am about to launch a non-fiction book about the journey I made overland by car to take up my new job in Calcutta.

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For my third ten years I built and ran three London restaurants under the name of La Petite Auberge de Saint-Savin (chefing my lead one). My lead restaurant was a popular haunt for politicians and journalists in the late 80s and received applause from the press including the late greats, Jonathon Meades and Fay Maschler. My clients included Terry Jones of Monty Python, Peter Mandelson, Roy Hattersley, television’s John Snow, Lord King, then CEO of British Airways, the Governor of the Bank of England, Robin Lee Pemberton and numerous TV personalities. Cooking has always been a passion throughout my life. My wife is not allowed in the kitchen.

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For my fourth ten years I became an artist: painting, sculpture and ceramics and a spot of radio journalism for BBC South. I had four satisfactory exhibitions, and several critiques in the national press (including a double page spread in the Independent).

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For my fifth ten years I invested in and became CEO for a group of construction and engineering companies based in London and the south east. In that time I led the team that facilitated and project managed the joint millennium funding for the Portsmouth Spinnaker Tower. This was a period when I felt the need to money as I was then in my seventies and was indulging my passion for classic cars.

zillas 24904

  A passion for Classic cars

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For my sixth ten year change I have returned to writing. This time it is fiction and I have become a novelist. I have three books in the market, a fourth due out at the end of June (though this is autobiographical) and a fifth due to launch in September; with two more on the blocks as WIP.

My most popular novel is The Girl in the Baker’s Van which sold well from the day of its launch in August 2018. The Girl in the Baker’s Van: BUY HERE

I am not sure what my next change will be. I enjoy monstrously good health, love to drive long distances (often do the 1600 kilometre drive from our house in France to our apartment in England in a one day hit), love walking, swimming, motorcycling – and sometimes climbing trees. I enjoy cooking (I do all the meals in our household and also love to cook for a crowd), good wine and jawing.

The Girl In The Bakers Van_pb-eb3

The Girl in the Baker’s Van

Book Blurb: Evangeline Pfeiffer has a stolen secret. There are those who will kill her to get it back.

Ever since the German occupation, Evangeline Pfeiffer has worked at the bakery in the small French town of Turckheim. Each morning, with Alain her brother, she helps make the bread and pastries for Joseph, the baker. It is a life of routine and order.
But when Alain is arrested by the Gestapo, her life is turned upside down. Unwittingly, she becomes an accomplice in the murder of Nazi agent Ludwig Kraus. Thrown together with the killer, a Polish spy, Kasha, her only hope is to escape to Spain. Taking the baker’s van she and Kasha drive south. She has burnt her bridges – there is no going back. She is on the run – but the spy running with her is not all he seems.

Behind them as they twist and turn across Occupied France, their pursuers are closing in: the Gestapo, the German spy catchers (Sicherheitsdienst) and, most terrifying of all, the ruthless French secret police, La Carlingue. If they catch her she knows she will be violated then executed.

In the city of Dijon Kasha is captured. On her own, her chances of escape fading she flees south, the net tightening around her. Then in Lyon she meets Grainger, a British SOE agent – he could be the game changer. If she can persuade him to help her, this could be her ticket out. Grainger is reluctant, he has his own mission, he can’t afford passengers – but she’s sticking to him. She’s not about to let go…

 

You can connect with Richard on Twitter: @rsavin_author